All posts by charlesworth23

I lead birdwatching and nature tours with my company Avocet Tours, which I started in year 2000. I also conduct several tours a year for British based birding tour company Limosa Holidays.

Saskatchewan ~ Cranes & Geese. Oct 2 to 7, 2018

September 29 to Oct 2 – I arrived ahead of the group of September 29, flying into Saskatoon and picking up a rental vehicle, then driving north to Prince Albert for the night. I spent September 30 exploring Prince Albert National Park, beginning with a little exploration of the lovely little town of Waskesiu. It was cold, breezy and there was a skiff of snow on the ground. As I pulled up to the shore of Waskesiu Lake, I immediately

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‘Red’ Fox Sparrow. Waskesiu, SK. Sep 30, 2018. Chris Charlesworth.

noticed a bunch of birds on the ground foraging. There were sparrows, including ‘Red’ Fox Sparrow, Chipping Sparrow, Harris’s Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow and White-crowned Sparrow here. Hermit Thrush also hopped about on the ground, along with a number of ‘Slate-colored’ Dark-eyed Juncos. In the trees around the town, the wheezy calls of Boreal Chickadees were heard often, along with the mechanical ‘beeping’ of Red-breasted Nuthatches. I went to photograph some elk on a lawn, when I heard a strange call note. I tracked it down and it was a Palm Warbler, along with a few ‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warblers. A Black-backed Woodpecker was a nice surprise this morning, right near the playground on the shore of the lake. Huddled on the beach were a few Ring-billed, California and Bonaparte’s gulls.

I explored down the road to the Narrows, encountering about the world’s tamest Red Fox along the way. Obviously people had been feeding this animal. Down at the Narrows I saw a group of three River Otters on a sandbar, and today I saw many Red Squirrels and

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Spruce Grouse. Prince Albert Nat Park, SK. Sep 30, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

several Mule and White-tailed deer as well. A Winter Wren called several times and appeared briefly. A short walk along the Treebeard Trail produced more Boreal Chickadees, another Winter Wren, some White-winged Crossbills and a late Orange-crowned Warbler.

Before I left the park I took a walk along the Boundary Bog Boardwalk. The highlight here for me was a stunning male Spruce Grouse that was sitting right in the middle of the trail. More Boreal Chickadees, my first Canada Jays, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Brown Creeper and the calls of American Three-toed Woodpeckers were also found here. I drove back down to Saskatoon where I spent the night.

The next morning I headed out towards Viscount, east of Saskatoon, where ebird showed a few reports of Whooping Cranes. Today, a light snow fell for much of the day. Birds were numerous though. I found the area where a couple thousand Sandhill Cranes were

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Whooping Cranes, Muskiki Lk, SK. Oct 1, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

foraging on a distant hillside. Suddenly some white shapes appeared from behind a hill and they were Whooping Cranes, 9 of them.

Ponds and lakes in the Viscount area were full of the usual waterfowl, and fields had quite a few American Golden-Plovers today. Rusty Blackbirds were fairly common, at the edges of ponds and puddles. I searched through hundreds of Lapland Longspurs, looking for Smith’s Longspur with no luck. There were some Horned Larks mixed in however.

From Viscount I headed to Muskiki Lake and on a small puddle a few km from the lake, I found three more Whooping Cranes resting. One particular field had 70 or so American Golden-Plovers. Harris’s Sparrows were noted at various places today. Feeling I had successfully ‘scouted’ this area for the tour, I headed back to Saskatoon.

On my final morning of scouting, I was joined by Nancy, Liz and Cathy, from Prince

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Lapland Longspur. Viscount, SK. Oct 1, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

George. We returned to the Viscount area where again we found several Whooping Cranes at the same place I had seen them the day before. Liz spotted an American Goldfinch, and several Harris’s Sparrows along a muddy track. A single Rusty Blackbird flew overhead, calling.

Before we finished up for the day, I spotted an immature Sabine’s Gull, locally a rare bird, as it foraged on a lake alongside Franklin’s and Ring-billed Gulls. Near Crawford Lake we enjoyed watching a massive flock of geese, with mostly Snow Geese involved, as they flew and landed several times on the fields.

The group was supposed to all arrive this afternoon and evening, but mother nature had other plans. There was quite a significant early season snow fall in Calgary, and this delayed several people. Those of us that were present went out for dinner at an Italian restaurant in downtown Saskatoon.

Oct 3 – We awoke to a nicer day, with mixed sun and cloud as we explored trails along the South Saskatchewan River at ‘the weir’. A few lingering migrants were about including Yellow-rumped and Orange-crowned warblers, Lincoln’s, Swamp, Fox and

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Red-throated Loon. ‘The Weir’. Saskatoon, SK. Oct 3, 2018. Photo: Melissa Hafting.

White-throated sparrows, Hermit Thrush, Ruby-crowned Kinglet and the like. Down on the river we spotted an adult Red-throated Loon, a local rarity that had been present for several days. Cathy spotted a Black-crowned Night-Heron resting in the trees and it flushed and headed straight past much of the rest of the group. Blue Jays called, but mostly remained hidden in the trees. Downy and Hairy woodpeckers were noted here. By the time we were finished here, we’d tallied close to 40 species.

After a coffee stop, we returned to the airport area to pick up Dave and Julia, from California. They were supposed to arrive the previous evening, but the Calgary snowstorm had delayed them until lunch time today. Once they had joined us we headed east of Saskatoon to Colonsay where we had a delicious lunch at the Tin Shack Restaurant, home of the soon to be famous Meatloaf Grilled Cheese sandwich. After lunch we made our way to Viscount to find Whooping Cranes for the group. It took a bit

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Whooping Cranes, E. of Saskatoon, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Melissa Hafting.

of searching, but eventually we found a group of Whooping Cranes in a field. We counted several times and eventually came up with 26 birds in the group, a great start to our crane and goose tour! In addition to the Whooping Cranes, there were many Sandhill Cranes in the area as well. We encountered a huge flock of Snow Geese this morning, and I got the scope out and showed the group one Ross’s Goose mixed in. Raptors were quite prevalent as well, with a lot of Red-tailed Hawks seen most days on tour. We had a couple of Bald Eagles this afternoon, as well as Northern Harrier and a Rough-legged Hawk. We returned to Saskatoon in the evening as the sun set. Back at the hotel we were met by Dave from Calgary, the final delayed participant to arrive! Finally, we were a full group, including 10 participants, myself and co-leader Melissa Hafting. We went for dinner at a local favorite restaurant, the Granary.

Oct 4 – This morning we headed S.E. of Saskatoon towards Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Refuge, apparently the oldest of its kind in North America. A locally rare Bay-breasted Warbler had been spotted along the S. Saskatchewan River at Kinsmen Park, so we checked here first. We couldn’t find the warbler, but we did see some other interesting species such as ‘Red’ Fox Sparrow, Hermit Thrush, Orange-crowned Warbler, and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. On the river we spotted the Red-throated Loon again, this time farther away, but nonetheless, a chance for those people who had not yet arrived when we saw the loon the first time, to see it as well themselves. We picked up lunch at Subway and then headed south. As we drove along Hwy 11, we spotted an unusual raptor sitting on a fence post next to the highway, so we pulled over, got out the scopes, and after walking a short distance closer, we determined it to be a light morph immature Rough-legged Hawk. Flocks of Snow Geese, Canada Geese, Cackling Geese, and a few Sandhill Cranes were scattered across the horizon.

The bumpy road towards the refuge produced a few flocks of geese, Northern Harrier,

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Gray Partridge, Last Mountain Lake, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Melissa Hafting.

and a number of Red-tailed Hawks. Melissa radioed to me that there were Gray Partridge up ahead so my van sped off to have a look. Luckily we arrived just in time and watched the covey of partridge wander across an open field and disappear into a stand of aspens. We took the ‘scenic route’ around Last Mountain Lake, due to the fact that on our main route in, there was a full on cattle drive in operation. The cowgirl, named ‘Cheryl’ apparently, kindly told us they’d be 20 min to a half hour until the cows were off the road, so we tried a different route. We didn’t end up at the headquarters on our first try, but rather at the Last Mountain Lake Regional Park, where a quick scan of the lake produced Horned Grebe, Red-necked Grebe, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Bonaparte’s Gulls and more. In a nearby field we paused to look through a flock of mixed Lapland Longspurs and Horned Larks. Our second try was successful and we ended up

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American Avocet. Last Mountain Lake, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

at the refuge headquarters. Here, we utilized their facilities, and then embarked on the short walking look through the grasslands. It was cool and breezy out there, and we were all bundled up. Birds were few and far between as we walked through the mixed prairie grasses. Birding on the ponds and lakes, however, was very productive. We pulled up to the shore of the lake, got out our scopes and began scanning, new birds being called out from every which direction. ‘Great Blue Heron’, somebody said, and another person called out ‘American White Pelican’. There were American Avocets, Pectoral Sandpipers, Tundra Swans, Redheads, Canvasbacks. American Coots and many other species present here today. Raptors were also fairly numerous today, with several sightings of Red-tailed Hawks, Bald Eagles, Northern Harrier, Rough-legged Hawk and Merlin. Melissa’s participants saw our only Swainson’s Thrush of the tour, a bird perched on a fence post next to the road. Western

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‘Prairie’ Merlin. Last Mtn Lake, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Melissa Hafting.

Meadowlarks were seen nicely as they skulked through the short grasses. All in all it was a fantastic day. We had dinner at a Greek place, that really wasn’t very Greek at all. We’ll all take a round of double moussakas!

Oct 5 – We loaded up our luggage today, as we would be traveling on to Prince Albert at the end of the day today. Once we picked up sandwiches at Subway from perhaps the most friendly Subway employee ever, we headed east to Viscount. Dave A, the most delayed of all the folks from Calgary’s weather fiasco, still hadn’t see Whooping Cranes, so we returned to the same area we had seen them two days earlier. It didn’t take long to spot the large white figures out in the field and within no time we were enjoying fantastic views of 26 Whooping Cranes through the scope! A short look in a patch of brush before we left added a Great Horned Owl to our trip list. We saw several American Tree Sparrows, and a White-breasted Nuthatch flew

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Grain elevator near Muskiki Lake, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

right over our heads. New for the mammal list this morning were two Striped Skunks that were frolicking about at the edge of the road, and a Thirteen-lined Ground-Squirrel seen by Melissa and her passengers.

We explored a road along the east side of Muskiki Lake next, and one of the first interesting species we saw was a Ruffed Grouse right on the side of the road. As we pulled up close to the grouse, a flock of Gray Partridge flew from one patch of trees to another. Where we had lunch it was pretty quiet, though Monica did hear a calling Blue Jay. Down on a pond closer to the lake were a couple hundred Cackling Geese. We paused to take some photos of a rather scenic red grain elevator, a real iconic Canadian scene, out on the prairie. I took the group to a pond north of Muskiki Lake where I had seen 3 Whooping Cranes earlier in the week. To my surprise there were 5 there today! Cathy almost flushed 2 American Golden-Plovers from the prairie right beneath her feet, but the birds scurried a short distance and we were able to view them through the scopes.

Making a last minute decision we altered our itinerary and headed for the town of Marcelin, about an hour away. There had been ebird reports of large numbers of Whooping Cranes in the area. We checked the ebird location, but found nothing but empty fields being worked over by harvesters. Next, we tried another spot that I had heard about, in some fields in the opposite direction. As we drove closer, I spotted a field dotted in large white birds. They were Whooping Cranes. We hopped out of the van and began counting. Our counts came up with a high of 126 Whooping Cranes, all in one flock! This made our day total of Whoopers, 157, not far off %30 of the wild world population of these beautiful birds. We all left feeling emotional and in awe that we had seen so many Whooping Cranes today.

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Part of unprecedented flock of 126 Whooping Cranes, near Marcelin, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Melissa Hafting.

Once in Prince Albert we went out for dinner at Amy’s Restaurant, which was very nice. After dinner we headed into the outskirts of Prince Albert, in the dark, ending up in front of the house of my friend’s Harold and Shelly Fisher, a father and daughter, who operate an owl banding station here. Technically, first we ended up in somebody else’s driveway, but that’s not important. Upon arrival we were greeted by Harold, and Shelly and her other half, Dale. They were holding two species of owl, one a Northern Saw-whet Owl and the other a Long-eared Owl. All 15 of us trudged into Harold’s kitchen where we

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Colors around Prince Albert, SK. Sep 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

admired the owls and watched as the bird received its new piece of jewelry, a leg band with an identifying number on it. The owls were studied for plumage molt, and thus could be determined their age. By weighing the owls we determined the owl’s sex, as females are heavier than males. Liz got to release the lovely Long-eared Owl, whose name had now been coined as Hooper. Many others got to release Northern Saw-whet Owls, as we banded several of them tonight. A Barred Owl called from the woods here too. The night sky was wonderful, and we said goodbye to the banders and returned to Prince Albert for some much needed rest.

Oct 6 – After picking up lunch to go at Tim Horton’s, we left Prince Albert and drove north for about an hour, to Prince Albert National Park. Along the way, we paused to photograph a male Pileated Woodpecker that was working away on a telephone pole. Cathy thought she saw a Great Gray Owl, which got our excitement levels up, but upon

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Female Spruce Grouse. Prince Albert National Park. SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

return the bird was no longer there. Once in the park, a few stray snowflakes were falling. We headed for the Boundary Bog trail and boardwalk. The first interesting birds we found were Golden-crowned Kinglets and several Boreal Chickadees. Farther along the path, several people caught a glimpse of a female Spruce Grouse in the bog. We all saw a female and then a male Spruce Grouse a little further down the path, where both were sitting at the edge of the trail. ‘Male American Redstart’, Nancy said, and we quickly scrambled to get the best viewing place of this little gem of a warbler as it foraged on, and close to the ground. It was moving about with one or two ‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warblers. Eventually everyone had a lovely look at the bird, which, though rather common as a breeding species, should be much farther south at this point in the migration.

We pulled into a parking spot in Waskesiu and I hopped out and exclaimed ‘Harris’s Sparrows’, as two of these rather uncommon, and sought-after sparrows, foraged on a grassy hillside. ‘Woodpecker’ called Monica, and once the scope was on the bird, it was revealed to be a female American Three-toed Woodpecker. Red-breasted Nuthatches and Dark-eyed Juncos were rather numerous, and there were a few Yellow-rumped Warbler

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Cape May Warbler. Waskesiu, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

around, but Melissa found another nice rarity this morning, a male Cape May Warbler. This bird also got people scrambling, for good views and to grab their cameras. Out on a little rocky point there were Ring-billed, California and two Herring gulls, the latter species, the only for the tour of its kind. Another woodpecker flew over and Melissa and I discussed that we thought it was a Black-backed Woodpecker. It did not ever reappear however, so we will never know for sure.

We headed down the Narrows Road, pulling in at South Bay to have lunch. It was cold, and windy and everybody except me stayed in the vehicle to eat. By the time I had finished my sandwich, the lettuce poking out the far end had frozen! We flushed a male Snow Bunting from the side of the road as we headed towards the Narrows. We saw a few Canada Jays, as they gave off their alarm calls and slinked off into the boreal forest. A displaying male Ruffed Grouse was another great highlight this morning, as he pranced about at the side of the road with his black ruff fully flared out. At the Narrows there were a few Hooded Mergansers, Common Goldeneye, Common Loon, and a Belted

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Snow Bunting. Prince Albert National Park, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Melissa Hafting.

Kingfisher. I let out my best Barred Owl imitation, and it must have been ok, since several of the birders in my group emerged from the woods to see where the owl was. It did attract a couple of Blue Jays and a Hairy Woodpecker at least. We had a quick look along the bottom reaches of the Treebeard Trail, but again did not find much. An American Three-toed Woodpecker was heard and my Barred Owl call entertained the group. As we drove back towards Waskesiu, Melissa radioed, ‘Snow Bunting’, so we stopped and sure enough there was another Snow Bunting, this one a female type, foraging in the leaflitter in the ditch. We returned to Waskeskiu via the golf course, where several Elk were resting and feeding on the greens. In town, some people went to look one more time for the Black-backed Woodpecker, but all they found was a Cooper’s Hawk and not much else. Others had a coffee and a snack in the deli before we began the journey of just over two hours back to Saskatoon. This evening we went out

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Elk. Waskesiu, SK. Oct 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

for dinner at Station Place, an old railway car converted into a restaurant.

Oct 7 – Our final morning of birding in Saskatchewan began at 7 AM. We headed south of town to Blackstrap Reservoir where we spent much of the morning. Upon arrival we saw a whole group of Double-crested Cormorants, one of which was really harassing a Ring-billed Gull to give up its food. Dave A, and several others came back from a walk along the shore boasting they had seen a Yellow-headed Blackbird so we all went and took a look. Sure enough, a Yellow-headed Blackbird, a male, was foraging in the grasses right at the edge of the road. A female Belted Kingfisher sat in a bush next to the lake, surveying the situation, while on the water were Bufflehead, Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebe, Pied-billed Grebe, Lesser Scaup and more. A single American White Pelican was good to see, since some of the folks found a dead one on the beach as well. An immature Black-crowned Night-Heron, only our second for the trip, flew across the water. Overhead were skeins of Snow Geese and I picked out a Ross’s Goose, but couldn’t get anyone else onto it before they had disappeared. Four Harris’s Sparrows sat together on a fence next to the road at one point, and finally we had pretty good views of Blue Jays here. Yellow-rumped Warblers and Ruby-crowned Kinglets were moving through the lakeside vegetation, and we saw a Hairy Woodpecker and a ‘Yellow-shafted’ Northern Flicker too. Our list of species for this location was nearly 40 species!

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Almost a full group shot, except for Nancy. Chris was taking the picture! Oct 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

We headed back towards Saskatoon, stopping in at Gabriel Dumont Park. There had been a couple of uncommon warblers reported here the day before, but we couldn’t find them. Melissa and I did hear the ‘tshat’ call note of a Common Yellowthroat here though. Two Swamp Sparrows performed nicely for everyone, allowing scope views and Black-capped Chickadees were numerous. Our final official birding stop of the tour was at Heritage Park where there had been a Magnolia Warbler reported. It didn’t take too long for Melissa to find it and eventually most of us had enjoyed pretty good views. While searching for the Magnolia, I spotted a Nashville Warbler, and it was seen by at least one other tour participant. Both of these warbler species should be long gone from the Saskatoon area by this point in the fall migration. Another addition to the trip list here, finally, was Common Grackle. We saw White-breasted Nuthatch for just the second time on the tour, and Nancy pointed out a ‘Red’ Fox Sparrow here. We scurried off, as our bellies were telling us it was time for lunch. Our final meal of the tour was a good one at the Saskatoon landmark ‘The Berry Barn’. After lunch we returned to the airport area, said our goodbyes and hoped for smooth travels for everyone on their return trips home. Our trip list total was 107 bird species.

Chris Charlesworth

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Vancouver Island ~ Limosa Holidays. September 11 to 21, 2018.

Day 1    I met three members of the group at the arrivals hall of Vancouver International Airport this evening. We made the short journey to our hotel in Richmond, where we met Tony and Eva, who had already been exploring Vancouver for about a week.

Day 2    At 8 AM we left our hotel and headed to Tsawwassen Ferry Jetty, where we made our first official birding stop of the tour. It was quite a productive stop in fact, and we

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Glaucous-winged Gull. Vancouver, BC. Sept 12, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

had some great birds like Black Oystercatcher, Caspian Tern, Common Loon, Horned Grebe, Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant, Northern Pintail, Pelagic Cormorant and several other species. We boarded the BC Ferry vessel at Tsawwassen and we departed for Swartz Bay on Vancouver Island at 10 AM. It was quite a nice day to be out on the Salish Sea, with calm waters, no rain and relatively little wind. There were few birds though. Some of the highlights included Glaucous-winged Gulls, California Gulls, Pelagic Cormorants, Surf Scoters, and a distant adult Parasitic Jaeger chasing after some gulls. Cyndy spotted some Black Turnstones that disappeared into the rocks before anyone else could see them. On the crossing we saw three mammals, Harbour Porpoise and Harbour Seal, and a buck Mule Deer on the shore of Galiano Island as we passed by.

We arrived on Vancouver Island at 11:45 AM sharp, and headed over to the Victoria

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Bewick’s Wren. Victoria, BC. Sep 12, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

International Airport, at the end of Canora Road, to look for some open country species. In the hedges at the little cemetery there we saw several White-crowned Sparrows, with both adult and immature birds present. A Lincoln’s Sparrow sat atop the hedge for a moment before flying off, and a Bewick’s Wren showed quite well. Star of the show perhaps was a male Anna’s Hummingbird who put on a nice show for us. Overhead, we spotted some Turkey Vultures, a Red-tailed Hawk and an American Kestrel, as well as a somewhat distant Peregrine Falcon. Cyndy spotted some Eurasian Skylarks here, a species found in North America only on southern Vancouver Island in the Victoria area.

We had lunch at Smitty’s in Sidney and then carried on south to Swan Lake Nature Reserve. At this point in the day it was quite pleasant with sunny skies and warm temperatures. Down at Swan Lake we scoped the slimy waters and found a nice selection of birds including Pied-billed Grebe, a stripy headed juvenile, Green-winged Teal, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail and American Wigeon. A group of half a dozen Pectoral Sandpipers flew about the shore as though they were looking for

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Pectoral Sandpipers. Swan Lake, Victoria, BC. Sep 12, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

somewhere to land. Unfortunately for them, there was no shore to land on. In the rather lush vegetation surrounding the lake we had some very nice birds this afternoon, and most of them we obtained good views of. There were a couple of male Downy Woodpeckers, the smallest woodpeckers on the continent, foraging amongst the Garry Oak trees. Chestnut-backed Chickadees, the only chickadee species found on Vancouver Island, were foraging as well and we saw a couple of tiny Golden-crowned Kinglets. Another Lincoln’s Sparrow popped up just long enough for a quite view, and more Bewick’s Wrens kept popping out of the bushes. Anna’s Hummingbirds were very numerous here as well, and we tallied over a dozen of them at Swan Lake. A Pacific-slope Flycatcher hopped about giving most of us at least reasonable views of it. Attractive Spotted Towhees lurked in the bushes, occasionally coming out to show themselves off, as they should! It was also very nice to get a view of a Marsh Wren as it poked about in a bundle of cattail fluff. New for the mammal list here was the invasive Eastern Gray Squirrel, perhaps not the most loved of North American exports to the U.K.

The day was getting on so we headed for Victoria where we checked into our hotel along the harbour. We had a very good dinner on the harbour at Belleville’s.

Day 3    Our first stop this morning was at Clover Point, a rocky headland that juts out into the Salish Sea at the south end of Vancouver Island. It was overcast, breezy and cool this morning, and we found ourselves suddenly looking for warm hats and jackets. A

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Heermann’s Gull. Clover Point, Victoria, BC. Sep 13, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

lovely assortment of Black Oystercatchers and Harlequin Ducks greeted us along the shore at Clover Point. Also there, several gull species including the rather attractive Heermann’s Gull. We also had nice views of some of the more common species of gull here such as California Gull and Glaucous-winged Gull. Scanning out to sea we had somewhat distant views of Rhinoceros Auklets and Pigeon Guillemot, as well as Pelagic Cormorants, Mew Gulls, and Surf Scoters. One or two Savannah Sparrows briefly appeared on the rocky shore as well.

We headed for the somewhat sheltered portions of Beacon Hill Park. At first it appeared rather quiet in the park with just a few Mallards on one pond and a few Eastern Gray Squirrels hopping about on the grass. Things suddenly began looking up however, when we encountered a nice little flock of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in the trees. Mixed in with them were Red-breasted Nuthatches, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and quite  few Orange-crowned Warblers. A Pacific-slope Flycatcher appeared briefly, and we had nice views of a female Downy Woodpecker. A large, lanky Great Blue Heron

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Black Turnstone. Ogden Point, Victoria, BC. Sep 13, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

looked a bit out of place high up in a fir tree next to the pond. A couple of Dark-eyed Juncos made their cameo appearances, along with Song Sparrow, Anna’s Hummingbird and Bewick’s Wren. On the ponds we sorted through the Mallards and found American Wigeon, Northern Shoveler and Green-winged Teal.

A much needed coffee break was taken before we walked out to the end of the Ogden Point Breakwater. Thankfully it was a little warmer now, and we when there were no birds to look at, there were two massive cruise ships pulled up nearby for our viewing entertainment. Best of all along the breakwater was a group of 20 or so Black Turnstones that were foraging on the rocks below us.

We had lunch in the Breakwater Café before heading west to Esquimalt Lagoon, via the Trans Canada Hwy. Along the way, we saw an Osprey flying over the water, presumably looking for its next meal. At the lagoon there were many gulls that included Glaucous-

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Black Oystercatcher. Esquimalt Lagoon, BC. Sep 13, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

winged, California, Mew and Heermann’s Gulls. A few shorebirds were present, including over a dozen Black Oystercatchers, 15 or so Western Sandpipers and 2 Least Sandpipers. Perhaps the best bird here, was a lovely adult Trumpeter Swan, with this particular bird having been present throughout the summer. Along the shoreline we saw a nice group of Brewer’s Blackbirds and they were joined by two juvenile Brown-headed Cowbirds. Out on the sea, we scanned with the scope, finding quite a few birds including Pigeon Guillemot, Rhinoceros Auklets, Horned and Red-necked Grebe, Surf Scoter and Double-crested Cormorant. We returned to Victoria and had a very nice dinner at Jonathan’s Restaurant.

Day 4    Today we traveled from Victoria to Tofino, a journey of over 300 km. Before we left the hotel, our first American Robin was tallied in a berry tree next to the van. The trek to the west side of the island was broken up by a few stops, the first of which was at

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American Dipper near Victoria, BC. Sep 14, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Goldstream Provincial Park. Soon after we arrived and disembarked from the van, we spotted an immature American Dipper frolicking in the stream. We strolled along the stream which meanders through a nice patch of old growth coastal rainforest with towering Western Red Cedars, Douglas Firs and Douglas Maples. It was quite a nice morning, with a mix of sun and cloud, so we made the best of it. Birds were quite active and some of the highlights here included a stunning Red-breasted Sapsucker, as well as a female Pileated Woodpecker, North America’s largest living woodpecker species. Our first ‘Sooty’ Fox Sparrows of the trip emerged from the vegetation as did a rather skulky little Pacific Wren. Diana and I had a short but good look at a male Black-throated Gray Warbler as it foraged in trees near the trail. Steller’s Jays, British Columbia’s official provincial bird, were quite evident here. One of the jays was giving a perfect Red-tailed Hawk imitation as it sat atop a tree stump. On the top of a distant conifer, a female Red Crossbill sat, and yet another highlight moment occurred when a female Belted Kingfisher came in and landed nearby for good scope views.

Our next stop was for coffee in Mill Bay, and then we had another very productive session of birding at Somenos Marsh in Duncan. We saw quite a few female Purple Finches here, and one nice rosy colored male. Common Yellowthroats played ‘peekaboo’ from within the grasses along the boardwalk and a Marsh Wren paused long enough for

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Steller’s Jay. Goldstream Prov. Park, Victoria, BC. Sep 14, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

scope views. Overhead, the sky seemed to be full of Violet-green Swallows and a few Barn Swallows. A Golden-crowned Sparrow sat atop a shrub, our first for the tour, while a Yellow Warbler hopped up into the sunlight at the top of a tree. A pair of Downy Woodpeckers were seen, and a Northern Flicker was heard. Some of us caught a glimpse of a Willow Flycatcher in the vegetation and overhead several flocks of Cedar Waxwings flew by, but refused to land. One immature bird did show in the scope at a distance briefly, so we put them on the list for the day.

As we made our way to Coombs, where we had lunch, the rain began to fall, and was quite heavy at times. We had lunch at the ‘Goats on the Roof’ market in Coombs and it was pretty good. After lunch we made a short pit stop in Port Alberni to fuel up the thirsty van, and then as we left town, I spotted an adult Bald Eagle sitting in a tall cedar tree along the river. The rest of the drive to Tofino was rather wet, but once we arrived at our accommodations on McKenzie Beach, we settled in and headed to the restaurant for a nice dinner.

Day 5    After a nice breakfast at our hotel, we spotted a few birds hopping about in the trees near the parking lot, including Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped. Yellow and Townsend’s warblers, and Warbling Vireos. At our first stop, the Tofino Mudflats behind

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Gr. White-fronted and Cackling geese. Tofino, BC. Sep 15, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Jamie’s Inn, we enjoyed seeing a group of a dozen Greater White-fronted Geese along with one lone Cackling Goose, the latter of which was a new species for everyone on the trip, except me.  Around 30 Common Mergansers were seen at fairly close range as we arrived, but they quickly swam offshore and flew off. A group of Western Sandpipers flew past several times, but there were no other shorebirds to be seen here. This could be due to the fact that a Peregrine Falcon made a pass over the flats. Two Ospreys were a treat to see, and one of them had a fish in its grasp.

 

We checked the mudflats from the lookout at the end of Sharp Road next. We saw some Black-bellied Plovers, Great Blue Herons and a Belted Kingfisher here, as well as two rather obliging Hutton’s Vireos in the cedar overhead. The showstopper here though, was a rather large Black Bear that we watched through the scope for half an hour or so as it rambled through the grass along the shore. Occasionally the bear would flip a rather

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Rainforest near Tofino, BC. Sept 15, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

large boulder over and eat whatever it found underneath. It would be hard to top this sighting today!

Next, we visited the area at the south end of the Tofino Airport. The open, scrubby habitat here produced a number of sparrows such as Golden-crowned, White-crowned, ‘Sooty’ Fox, Song, Lincoln’s and Savannah sparrows! Certainly a highlight here were the Cedar Waxwings, as many of them were foraging in the trees not far from the road. We had our first tantalizing view of Northern Flicker, a bird the group really wants to see. Another group of geese flew overhead, this time containing 14 Greater White-fronted Geese and two Cackling Geese. A number of tiny Vaux’s Swifts, looking more like bats that birds as Cyndy noted, allowed us great views as the flew down low over the shrubs. We even saw two of the larger Black Swifts up in the sky this morning as well.

Wickaninnish Beach was our most productive area today. We scanned out over the Pacific from the viewing deck, spotting such gems as Red-throated and Pacific loons, Rhinoceros Auklet, Pigeon Guillemot, Common Murre, Brandt’s Cormorant, Surf Scoters, Harlequin Ducks, and quite a few distant Sooty Shearwaters. Folks were quite excited to see Common Loons in their rather stunning breeding plumage here today as well. On the beach, there were perhaps a couple of hundred silvery Sanderlings running about at the edge of the waves. Mixed in amongst them were a few Western Sandpipers.

Next on the agenda was lunch and we had that in Ucluelet at the Gray Whale Deli. When we walked out of the door of the restaurant I mentioned to watch for Bald Eagles. ‘Like

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View at Amphitrite Point, Ucluelet, BC. Sept 15, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

that one’, said Cyndy, as she pointed to an adult Bald Eagle perched on top of a cedar! We then headed for the Amphitrite Point Lighthouse. It was very scenic here, with the rugged west coast at its finest. Birds were few on the water, though there were scoters and cormorants flying by offshore. In the trees along the trails here we had some Golden-crowned Kinglets and a very inquisitive Hutton’s Vireo.

In Ucluelet, we visited the harbour, checking the area near a fish processing plant. A few fisherman were cleaning their catch, a nice looking halibut, and they threw some of the skin and bones into the water. A large Steller’s Sea-Lion was feasting on the scraps, as was a smaller Harbour Seal. Out on the rock jetty were a few dapper Black Turnstones, and we studied and interesting gull that was most likely a Herring X Glaucous-winged gull hybrid. Our second Bald Eagle of the day, another adult flew right overhead, and the cameras clicked.

We made another stop at Wickaninnish Beach, this time heading south from the visitor’s center towards what’s known as South Beach. A gentle rain fell, but stopped shortly after. A sign at the beginning of the trail warned of a bear in the area. We saw several large piles of scat as well. At South Beach, which is pebbly and covered in seaweed and driftwood, there were several Spotted Sandpipers, which, at this time of the year, have no spots. Also there were Least Sandpipers and a number of Savannah Sparrows foraging on the beach. Scanning the ocean one more time, produced more views of the same seabirds, though a nice group of Sooty Shearwaters came in fairly close. In the fir trees beside the parking lot, a group of Red Crossbills, with male, female and two immatures, were feeding in the cones. Just as we returned to Tofino the rain began to fall

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Clay-colored Sparrow. Tofino, BC. Sept 16, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

and continued, quite heavy into the night. We had a very nice meal in town at Schooner’s this evening.

Day 6    We had planned on going birding before breakfast this morning, but the weather did not permit it. After we had breakfast we took a stroll down to Mackenzie Beach to see what was about, and by then the rain had stopped and there was blue sky on the horizon. In the bushes before we got to the beach were Savannah Sparrows, Fox Sparrows, Song Sparrows and Lincoln’s Sparrows. We found a locally rare Clay-colored Sparrow hopping about in the gardens of our hotel as well. Offshore rocks down at the beach had Brandt’s and Pelagic cormorants and an adult Greater White-fronted Goose. Bobbing on the ocean were Surf Scoter, Common Loon, Red-necked Grebe and a few Heermann’s Gulls.

We made our way to the dock to catch our 11 AM boat trip to see bears. The trip was full, with not a seat left and nearly everyone on board was from the U.K.! Eva and I and the two staff on the boat were the only Canadians. We steamed up into the inlet at a good pace, spotting a Bald Eagle on the way. Once we were in the area where the bears frequent, the skipper brought down the speed of the boat and the excitement was increasing amongst the passengers. A Black Bear was spotted and we headed towards

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Black Bear near Tofino, BC. Sept 16, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

him. He was quite large with a healthy, shiny black coat, and we was turning over large boulders with the mere swat of his paws. These bears are some of the largest in North America and that is because they are well fed on seafood. The skipper came down and asked if we’d be keen on chasing some Orcas that had been spotted nearby. Nobody complained about this and were no sooner speeding off, past salmon farms, around lushly vegetated islets and into the upper reaches of the inlet when we spotted the first spout. There were two Killer Whales here, a female and an old male, and these were of the rather fierce transient variety, famous for eating salmon, seal and sea lions. Soon, the whale took a deeper dive and we sat for a while wondering where it would pop up. With a sudden ‘whoosh’ of air, the large bull surfaced right next

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Orca near Tofino, BC. Sept 16, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

to our boat and did so several times! What an amazing and unforgettable sight. We then turned our attention back to Black Bears, finding a couple more large individuals foraging along the beaches.  We headed back towards Tofino, again spotting a majestic adult Bald Eagle watching over the harbour from its perch high in a massive cedar tree.

Back on dry land we visited the shop at Jamie’s and then headed for some lunch at the Rhino Café. After lunch we visited the local grocery store and then returned to our hotel and had a little time to explore the beach this lovely afternoon. We enjoyed dinner at our hotel and then hurried off for some much needed rest.

Day 7    Once again we met at the dock at Jamie’s, this time at 8 AM for a whale watching trip.  A bit of early morning fog quickly burned off and it ended up being a very nice day today. As we entered the lot at Jamie’s, two Raccoons sauntered across the road to the

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Steller’s Sea-Lions. Tofino, BC. Sept 17, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

edge of some blackberry bushes, looking as though they were up to no good. Once on the boat, the Chinook Princess we steamed around Vargas Island and back to Tofino. The journey took about 3 hours as we slowed down to view various types of wildlife along the way. There were Harbor Seals hauled up on the rocks, each one with a somewhat different pattern on its fur. Another rocky island was covered with Steller’s Sea-Lions, and a bull sat on an elevated perch and watched over his rather large harem. Cyndy and Diana spotted a Harbor Porpoise and the show stoppers were the Sea Otters. Several of these fluffy little balls of cuteness laid on their backs, wrapped in seaweed, and stared at us. In the bird department there were a lot of Pigeon Guillemots seen today, along with Rhinoceros Auklet, Common Murre and a couple of Marbled Murrelets. Surf Scoters were quite common, but we only saw one or two White-winged Scoters out there this morning. A few Red-necked Phalaropes fluttered past the boat, and we also saw some Black

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Bald Eagle. Tofino, BC. Sept 17, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Oystercatchers on the rocky islets. Up to three Bald Eagles were noted on the trip, with two adults and a darker immature bird tallied. Heermann’s Gulls showed themselves nicely and Tony and I saw an adult Western Gull sat next to a Glaucous-winged Gull for comparison. We had seen no whales today, but we were quite happy with what we had seen.

After lunch at Jamie’s Rainforest Inn, we checked out the mudflats quickly. There was not much action here as the tide was quite far out, though we did see Great Blue Herons and Greater White-fronted Geese. In the bushes next to the boardwalk were Common Yellowthroat, and Orange-crowned and Yellow warblers. Down at the Tofino Airport it was much quieter today than it had been a few days earlier. There were just a few Fox, Song, and White-crowned sparrows about today, as well as just one Cedar Waxwing. Two Northern Flickers showed quite well here however which was nice, and an American Kestrel flew overhead. At Long Beach the highlights were several Red

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Sea Otter. Tofino, BC. Sept 17, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Crossbills feeding on cones next to the parking lot, and a Merlin spotted soaring overhead by Cyndy.

Our final birding stop of the day was at Radar Hill. Here, we took in the stunning views of Clayoquot Sound and read the information at the Kap Yong War Memorial. Birds were few up here, though we did see a Townsend’s Warbler, a Hutton’s Vireo, Golden-crowned Kinglets, American Robin, Fox Sparrow and a nice Golden-crowned Sparrow. Common Raven flew by, croaking as it went along. This evening we had a very nice meal in Tofino at the Shelter.

Day 8    After breakfast we said farewell to Tofino and traveled south towards Ucluelet. Along the way we stopped in a Wickaninnish Beach to try one more time for the sought-after Wandering Tattler. We searched the rocks offshore and the pebble beach for the tattler, but he was hiding very well. Just as we were about to leave I spotted a tattler resting on some barnacle covered rocks. Farther out on the rocks were a couple of Black Turnstones and a Black Oystercatcher. A quick scan from the Kwisitis Visitor’s Center viewing deck was productive as we saw 4 Marbled Murrelets in a little group, as well as a group of Red-throated Loons bobbing up and down on the sea.

In Ucluelet, we made a short stop for coffee and then headed down to the community dock. We searched for Surfbird, which had been reported here, but couldn’t find it. We did, however, see our first Iceland Gulls of the tour. Steller’s Sea-Lion also played in the harbour this morning. It was a gorgeous sunny day for our drive across island, and we timed it just right to miss a section of road construction where the road would be closed for an hour. Phew!

In Port Alberni we had lunch and then made our way to Cathedral Grove. The towering trees here were very impressive. The Douglas Firs, Western Red Cedars and Western Hemlocks here can be over 800 years old. We didn’t see too many birds, other than Chestnut-backed Chickadee and Pacific Wrens, but that didn’t matter. We were here to see what a real old growth temperate rainforest is like.

Once at French Creek we visited the marina. There had been a special bird reported here, a Yellow-billed Loon. A bit of scanning turned up some Common Loons, Pacific Loons and eventually the Yellow-billed Loon as well. Four Greater Yellowlegs, the first of

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Greater Yellowlegs. British Columbia. Sept 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

their type we’d spotted, rested and fed on a sandbar at the estuary of French Creek. Also here were a few Killdeer. A Belted Kingfisher sat on a tree stump, that is until the cameras were aimed at it, and it was off like a shot. A Rhinoceros Auklet popped up right in front of us and a Pelagic Cormorant fed in the protected waters of the marina. A few Black Turnstones sat on the rocks at the edge of the breakwater.

Not far away, at the mouth of Englishman River, we scanned out to sea, spotting a nice surprise, an immature Ancient Murrelet. A flock of Bonaparte’s Gulls out over the sea were being chased by a Parasitic Jaeger, and then shortly thereafter by a Peregrine Falcon. Harlequin Ducks seen here, along with some nice Pacific Loons, Horned Grebes and Red-necked Grebes. Little was at the estuary, being it was high tide, though we did see some Green-winged Teal.

Soon we found ourselves in Nanaimo where we checked into our hotel, overlooking the harbour, and then we had a nice dinner, complete with a taste of Nanaimo Bar Cheesecake (for some).

Day 9    Our last morning on Vancouver Island was a beautiful one. It was sunny and warm as we walked along the west side of Buttertubs Marsh in Nanaimo. I say the west side, because we saw so many birds we never made it more than a quarter around the marsh loop. We were almost immediately inundated with ‘Audubon’s’, and ‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warblers, some Orange-crowned Warblers, Chestnut-backed Chickadees, Bewick’s Wrens, White-crowned Sparrows and Spotted Towhees. We had our first Ruby-

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Locally rare immature Broad-winged Hawk. Buttertubs Marsh, Nanaimo, BC. Sept 19, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

crowned Kinglet flitting about here in the trees, and we also saw our first American Goldfinches, a flock of them, all in winter plumage. Downy Woodpeckers foraged on the limbs of the trees and some Purple Finches were a nice treat as well. A Virginia Rail called several times from the marsh but remained hidden in the reeds. On the lake were Ring-necked Ducks and Wood Duck, both new for the trip list, as well as Pied-billed Grebe which we had only seen once thus far, much earlier on in the trip. Our best find today was an immature Broad-winged Hawk that was sitting above us in the dead top of a tree next to the marsh. This species primarily migrates to the east of the Rocky Mountains and is quite rare on Vancouver Island, with most sightings being of birds migrating overhead.

We made our way to Duke Point where we caught the ferry at 12:45 PM to Tsawwassen. We saw little in the way of birds during the crossing, and there was a brief Orca sighting, as the captain of the ship announced its presence. It was a nice crossing anyhow, and we enjoyed lunch in the cafeteria.

Once back on the mainland we headed for Boundary Bay at 104th St. The tide was just reaching its highest point as we arrived and there was a large flock of 200 or so Black-bellied Plovers resting out on the tufts of grass. An American Golden-Plover was a good bird to pick up amongst the Black-bellieds. Down towards the pilings we saw quite a few Pectoral Sandpipers and some very nice Baird’s Sandpipers. Seen flying past us were Long-billed Dowitchers and a Semipalmated Plover. A single Greater Yellowlegs let out

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Golden-crowned Sparrow. Vancouver, BC. Sept 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

its call, a wild, plaintive ‘killy killy killy’ that rang out over the mudflats. This was just our second time on tour so far to see Ring-billed Gull, as several sat on grassy islets. Up to 200 Northern Pintail gathered on the mudflats as the tide was retreating. The bushes next to the dike were alive with White-crowned, Lincoln’s and Song sparrows, as well as our first Black-capped Chickadees and House Finch of the tour. American Pipits foraged along the shore, allowing scope views. The afternoon was getting on so we returned to the van and drove to our hotel in Richmond. Dinner at Boston Pizza was enjoyable.

Day 10    At 8 AM we left the hotel and made our way to the Iona Sewage Ponds, next door to Vancouver International Airport. Our first Northern Harrier of the tour, a nice female, flew past low over the mudflats on approach to Iona. We spent some time checking out the four inner ponds and one outer pond that make up the Iona Sewage

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Least Sandpiper. Iona Sewage Ponds, Richmond, BC. Sept 20, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Ponds. Shorebirds were not numerous but we did find our first Lesser Yellowlegs here, along with Spotted Sandpiper, a Long-billed Dowitcher, several Pectoral Sandpipers and a tame Least Sandpiper. Cyndy photographed a Greater Yellowlegs, our only one for the day. A Wilson’s Snipe was flushed from the shore, and gave its short raspy call as it flew off. Waterfowl on the pond included Northern Pintail, Mallard, Green-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler and our first Gadwall of the tour. Quite a few sparrows were lurking in the bushes and along the side of the path. There were Song, Savannah, Lincoln’s, White-crowned and Golden-crowned sparrows here, as well as Spotted Towhees, House Finches, Common Yellowthroat and female Red-winged Blackbird. At one point, two Peregrine Falcons sailed in and progressed to hunt together, disappearing over the mudflats. On the outer pond we finally caught up with American Coots, and we saw more waterfowl including Green-winged Teal, Northern Pintail and Mallards. The real highlight here was watching a pair of River Otters foraging at the edge of the reeds for several minutes.

Our next stop was at Queen Elizabeth Park, inside the city limits of Vancouver proper. We checked the big cedar trees for roosting owls with no luck, though we did find a few lingering migrants such as Wilson’s Warbler and Hermit Thrush. Another Gadwall, an attractive male, was on a small pond here amongst dozens of Mallards. We got our daily dose of Eastern Gray Squirrel here, as one of the black individuals bounded across the lawn.

We had lunch in Steveston at the Cimona Café and it was very nice. As we ate, a light rain began to fall outside. We checked more big cedar trees for owls at the Alaksen

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Sandhill Cranes. Westham Island, Ladner, BC. Sept 20, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Wildlife Refuge headquarters and then checked an old barn for Barn Owls, with no luck at either spot. As a nice consolation prize we were entertained by 15 Sandhill Cranes in a field not far from the road. We opened the door of the van, and even though it was raining, we enjoying watching cranes in comfort. As we crossed over the Westham Island Bridge we saw two Mute Swans paddling along in a little canal, our only for the tour. Other birds seen on Westham Island included Eurasian Collared-Dove and Cooper’s Hawk.

As the tide was rising we were positioned along the dike at Boundary Bay at the foot of 96th Street and then we checked the foot of 88th St as well. There were many shorebirds here today, including upwards of 700 Black-bellied Plovers, an American Golden-Plover, over a hundred Sanderling, a hundred plus Western Sandpipers, dozens of Pectoral Sandpipers, 4 Killdeer, 4 Baird’s Sandpipers, a Dunlin, 4-5 Red Knot, and two lovely Marbled Godwits. Raptors were numerous around Boundary Bay this afternoon. There were Northern Harriers and Peregrine Falcons terrorizing the birds on the mudflats, as

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Northern Harrier. Vancouver, BC. Sept 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

well as an adult Bald Eagle perched on a telegraph pole right overhead. At one stop, near the railway tracks, we had a ‘raptorfest’ as Cyndy called it. First, a Bald Eagle was seen in a tall tree and we then spotted a Merlin in the next tree over. A moment later a Red-tailed Hawk came in and chased the Merlin off, which flew a short distance to a fencepost. On a fencepost behind the Merlin we spotted a lovely juvenile Northern Harrier. It was all very exciting and cameras clicked wildly from all corners of the van. My camera was in the back of course. Another of the better birds of the day, an American White Pelican was seen through the scope on the mudflats, and this is a fairly rare species for the Lower Mainland. Next to an old barn with some old farm equipment we found several birds scratching about on the ground, such as House Finches, White-crowned Sparrows, Song Sparrows, and Lincoln’s Sparrows. It began to rain harder as we returned to our hotel. We enjoyed our final dinner at a local steakhouse.

Day 11    It was our last morning of the tour and we began with breakfast at Cora. It had rained a lot overnight, but the showers cleared for us today, leaving just cloudy skies and

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Wood Duck. Reifel Refuge. Ladner, BC. Sept 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

cool temperatures. We visited the famous George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary in Ladner today, exploring trails, hides and the gift shop at the refuge headquarters. We bought a small package of bird seed as well to feed the birds. As we walked the trails folks held seed in the palm of their hands and cute little Black-capped Chickadees came in to feed in droves. Soon thereafter, a group of Red-winged Blackbirds arrived and decided they were going to feed from the hand as well. Some of the brave blackbirds even sat on the tour participant’s heads! Waterfowl were plentiful at Reifel and we saw stunning male Wood Ducks here, along with Northern Pintail, Northern Shoveler, American Wigeon, Gadwall, Mallards, Hooded Mergansers, Green-winged Teal and a lone Trumpeter Swan! Several American Coots were seen, and Diana pointed out a pair of coot feet, with nothing else attached, atop the viewing tower. Obviously some sort of raptor had enjoyed a coot meal. Along the pathways there were many sparrows that included the regular species like Golden-crowned, White-crowned, Fox, Song and Lincoln’s sparrows. Feeding on the wing were several species of swallows including Barn Swallow and Violet-green Swallow which we had already seen on the tour, and Purple Martin, Cliff Swallow and Northern Rough-winged Swallow, all of which were new for us. From the viewing tower we scanned the delta of the Fraser River, and I spotted one lonely Snow Goose out there. Northern Harriers sailed about the marsh, and a single Bald Eagle sat on a distant pole. Some

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John with a Red-winged Blackbird. Reifel Refuge, Ladner, BC. Sept 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

shorebirds were noted here today including both Greater and Lesser yellowlegs and good numbers of Long-billed Dowitchers. We encountered a group of 30 or more Bushtits that were foraging in the weeds and long grasses along the edge of the trail. Diana spotted a Mink running on the trail in front of us, the second one we’d seen on the tour. Our final new bird species for the list was an adult Black-crowned Night Heron that was snoozing in the trees near a pond.

Before we left Westham Island we checked out the trees at the entrance to the Alaksen Wildlife Refuge once more for owls. Unfortunately, the owls were not cooperating on this tour. We headed towards the airport and had a late lunch at Denny’s before I said goodbye to the group and wished them safe travels back to the U.K. We had tallied 149 species, a respectable total indeed.

 

British Columbia ~ The Okanagan Valley. Aug 17 to 19, 2018 with Dick Cannings.

Aug 17 – Our International Ornithological Congress birding tour of the south Okanagan Valley began bright and early on Friday, August 17th, 2018. We met in downtown Vancouver at 6 a.m. and drove east up the Fraser Valley to find a good breakfast place and a quiet spot for some introductory birding. There were six participants, and four of them were from outside North America, so even the common species were exciting on the first day. A couple of stops in the eastern Fraser Valley got us started with Eurasian Collared Dove, Northern Flicker, Cedar Waxwing, Pine Siskin, and Orange-crowned Warbler.

At Hope we began the climb into the North Cascades; birds were quiet in the coastal rain forests on this western slope and the smoke from interior forest fires began to noticeably

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Gray Hairstreak. BC, Aug 2018. Photo: Michael Dawber.

thicken. At Manning Park we drove up into the subalpine meadows, where the air was clearer and birding was good. We saw Steller’s Jays, Canada Jays, Red-tailed Hawks, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets and Townsend’s Warblers in the spruce-fir forests.

After lunch we got back on the highway and continued east into the dry Interior forests around Princeton. At August Lake we had our first taste of waterbirds, adding Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Ruddy Duck, Pied-billed Grebe and American Coot, along with Western Wood-Pewee and Brewer’s Blackbird.

Driving east, the smoke became somewhat apocalyptic around Keremeos, so we just stopped to load up on peaches, nectarines, apricots and cherries (and California Quail) at a local fruit stand and continued on to the hotel in Osoyoos.

August 18 – The next morning, some of the group set out for some early morning birding west of Osoyoos, and the area was very birdy despite very thick smoke and dark conditions. We added Mourning Dove, Eastern Kingbird, Western Bluebird, Gray Catbird,

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Canyon Wren. Okanagan Valley, BC. Aug 2018. Photo: Michael Dawber.

Cassin’s Finch, Spotted Towhee, Western Tanager, and Lazuli Bunting in a flurry of birding.

After breakfast we all travelled to the north end of Osoyoos Lake. A stop at the highway bridge over the lake netted Red-necked Grebe, Ring-billed and California Gulls and an Osprey. At the north end of the lake, the meadows were full of American Goldfinch and Red-winged Blackbirds, and the marshy ponds had Virginia Rail, Sora, Short-billed Dowitcher, Wilson’s Snipe, Spotted Sandpiper, Solitary Sandpiper, Lesser Yellowlegs, an immature Bald Eagle and a Yellow-headed Blackbird. A Belted Kingfisher was a bonus along the Okanagan River.

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Matthias extracts an Olive-sided Flycatcher at Vaseux Lake. Aug 2018. Photo: Dick Cannings.

Next was a stop at the Vaseux Lake Bird Observatory, where bird numbers are monitored each fall through censuses and mist-netting. We were fortunate to find an Olive-sided Flycatcher in one of the nets, a species which breeds at higher elevations or further north.

We then drove west to the sagebrush grasslands of White Lake, where we had good views of Western Meadowlark and Vesper Sparrow. On the lake itself we added Baird’s Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper and Long-billed Dowitcher and an assortment of waterfowl.

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Rufous Hummingbird. Osoyoos, BC. Aug 2018. Photo: Michael Dawber.

After a short siesta at the hotel, we drove up Anarchist Mountain east of Osoyoos. The pine forests there had Mountain Chickadee and Pygmy Nuthatch, and the hummingbird feeders at our restaurant hosted Calliope and Rufous Hummingbirds. After supper we spotted a Great Horned Owl silhouetted on a roadside powerline at dusk.

August 19 – Sunday morning dawned very smoky as well, so we headed back to the Kruger Mountain Road area after breakfast, where the birding was very good in the open, shrubby forest. A big flock of Violet-green Swallows lined the power lines, and in the shrubs we saw a good variety of species including Downy Woodpecker, Red-naped Sapsucker, Cassin’s Vireo, House Wren, Swainson’s Thrush, Gray Catbird, Red Crossbill, Pine Siskins, Northern Waterthrush, and Black-headed Grosbeak. At some local feeders

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Fires burning in the hills near Keremeos, BC. Aug 2018. Photo: Dick Cannings.

we added an Anna’s Hummingbird.

Then it was back on the highway for the return trip to Vancouver. We stopped for a picnic lunch at Lightning Lakes in Manning Park, attracting a flock of Canada Jays to our table and Chestnut-backed Chickadees in the forest close by. An afternoon walk at Strawberry Flats was quiet except for Dark-eyed Juncos, Golden-crowned Kinglets and a single White-winged Crossbill.

We arrived back in Vancouver tired and smoky, but we’d seen or heard 120 species of birds.

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Group birding in Manning Park, BC. Aug 2018. Photo: Dick Cannings.

Bird List:

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
American Wigeon
Mallard
Green-winged Teal
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Harlequin Duck
Barrow’s Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Ruddy Duck
California Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Red-necked Grebe
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Bald Eagle
Swainson’s Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Virginia Rail
Sora
American Coot
Killdeer
Baird’s Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper (leader only)
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson’s Snipe
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ring-billed Gull
California Gull
Glaucous-winged Gull
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Common Nighthawk
Anna’s Hummingbird
Rufous Hummingbird
Calliope Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Lewis’s Woodpecker
Red-naped Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Western Wood-Pewee
Willow Flycatcher
Dusky Flycatcher
Say’s Phoebe
Western Kingbird (leader only)
Eastern Kingbird
Cassin’s Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Canada Jay
Steller’s Jay
Black-billed Magpie
Clark’s Nutcracker
American Crow
Northwestern Crow
Common Raven
Nor. Rough-winged Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Barn Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Mountain Chickadee
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Pygmy Nuthatch
Canyon Wren
House Wren
Marsh Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Western Bluebird
Swainson’s Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Waterthrush
Orange-crowned Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend’s Warbler
Wilson’s Warbler (leader only)
Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow (leader only)
Song Sparrow
Spotted Towhee
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Brewer’s Blackbird
Evening Grosbeak
House Finch
Cassin’s Finch
Red Crossbill
White-winged Crossbill
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Dick Cannings.

British Columbia ~ The Okanagan Valley. Aug 17 to 19, 2018

The International Ornithological Congress (IOC) pre-conference tour from Vancouver to the Okanagan Valley was attended by 9 people, and two guides. We split up into two groups, one led by myself and three scientists from Beijing, China, and the other with Dick Cannings as guide and 6 folks from various places. Dick’s write-up will follow this one, so be sure to read both to find out how many species each group saw.

August 17 – I met the three clients in West Vancouver, bright and early on August 17 at 6 AM. We drove east through the Fraser Valley, spotting our first species, Northwestern Crows, alongside the Trans-Canada Hwy. Smoke from widespread forest fires would accompany us for most of our tour unfortunately, and we could see the forest above Hope burning in the high country. After a short stop in Hope to pick up lunch, we headed to Sumallo Grove in Manning Park. Amongst the towering hemlock, cedar and fir trees we saw a few birds of interest including Yellow Warbler, Pacific Wren, Song Sparrow and some lovely Golden-crowned Kinglets. I spotted an American Dipper, but it flew away just as I pointed it out to the others.

Next, we explored the Alpine Meadows Road, climbing up to nearly 2000 meters elevation at the top. A few stops along the way up the road produced Mountain

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Sooty Grouse. Manning Park, BC. August 17, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

Chickadees, Canada Jays, Steller’s Jays, Common Raven and Yellow-rumped Warblers to name a few species. At the top parking lot we were treated to up close views of a male Sooty Grouse as he fed amongst the grasses. On a short walk up to the radio tower I heard the wheezy calls of Boreal Chickadee, but the birds would not appear for us. Another leader only bird, a Black Swift sailed overhead, but disappeared behind the trees before the pax could see it. We did enjoy several comical Columbian Ground-Squirrels as they called loudly in protest of our presence. Down at the viewpoint we had several Cascade Golden-mantled Ground-Squirrels as well, and our first Yellow Pine Chipmunk.

A walk at ‘the Beaver Pond’ was quite nice, though birds were somewhat quiet. We did have good looks at a female type Barrow’s Goldeneye that was actively feeding in the water. A Merlin sailed by and landed on a distant snag, thanks to Dick Cannings for point it out to us.

The skies turned a dark red as we approached Keremeos, where even more large fires were burning in the mountaintops. A roadside stop was very productive, adding our first of many Ospreys of the tour, and our only adult Bald Eagle of the trip. The Ospreys, included a juvenile on a nest, which was joined by and adult. For Lei, this bird was very special as it was one she had always wanted to see.

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Ospreys. Hedley, BC. August 17, 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

At Nighthawk Road, we found a nice little group of migrant sparrows that included Chipping, Brewer’s, Vesper and Lark sparrows. We flushed a group of nearly 20 Gray Partridge from the roadside weeds at one point as well. Nearby, we stopped to check out Frank Lake, and were rewarded with quite a few new species such as Great Blue Heron, American Coot, American Wigeon, Green-winged Teal, and a number of Pied-billed Grebes. We checked into our hotel in Osoyoos and then went out for a delicious evening meal at a nearby Italian restaurant.

August 18 – Taking advantage of early morning bird activity, we met at 6 AM and went out for a couple of hours before we had breakfast. We explored the Road 22 area, which was very ‘birdy’ this morning. Raptors were a main highlight however, and we saw an adult Peregrine Falcon, American Kestrel, a couple of immature Northern Harriers, Red-tailed Hawks, and many Ospreys. Western Wood-Pewees were flycatching from a fence line and were briefly joined by one or two Willow Flycatchers. Our first Red-winged Blackbirds posed nicely and we found two juvenile Brown-headed Cowbirds being fed by a relatively small female Common Yellowthroat. Our first groups of California Quail caused excitement amongst the people in my vehicle, as it was the first time they had

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Belted Kingfisher. Road 22, Osoyoos, BC. Aug 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

ever seen these comical and attractive game birds. In a muddy patch in a distance field we scoped some shorebirds that included both Greater and Lesser yellowlegs, Killdeer and a number of unidentified ‘peeps’. A Solitary Sandpiper flew over and called, showing us its distinctive tail pattern. Weedy patches were full of American Goldfinches, some House Finches, some Savannah Sparrows and overhead, I spotted a leader only Bobolink. Overhead, a couple of small groups of Northern Pintail flew by, adding another tick to our day list. One of the highlights this morning was a Belted Kingfisher that sat on a fence very close to us, allowing incredible views. We headed back into Osoyoos, but not before a short stop at another muddy patch at the north end of Osoyoos Lake. Dick had spotted a juvenile Short-billed Dowitcher here, locally quite rare, and we were quite happy to find it was still there when we arrived. The Short-billed was next to an adult Long-billed Dowitcher, and also nearby were over half a dozen Wilson’s Snipe, a Lesser Yellowlegs and Killdeer. As we drove across the bridge on Hwy 3 in Osoyoos we saw an attractive adult Red-necked Grebe, and Qingshan said that the stripy headed juveniles were even more attractive.

After breakfast we traveled east of Osoyoos, to Anarchist Mountain. In a grassland area we saw our first Swainson’s Hawks, three of them. A group of noisy Steller’s Jays caught my attention as we hiked through a nice patch of mixed forest on Anarchist Mountain. Their raucous calls led me right to a roosting Great Horned Owl. Upon spotting me, the owl flew a short distance and was joined by a second bird. ‘It’s always a good day when

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Great Horned Owl. Anarchist Mtn. Osoyoos, BC. Aug 2018. Photo: Chris Charlesworth.

you see an owl’, I commented. Other species seen on our walk included White-breasted and Red-breasted nuthatches, House Wren, Chipping Sparrow, Clark’s Nutcracker, Red-tailed Hawk and Turkey Vulture. An American Red Squirrel, which was at least partially seen by the participants, was our only for the weekend.

Back down in the valley, upon request, we headed for a winery for lunch, visiting the idyllic location of Covert Farms near Oliver. We enjoyed lunch and a sip of wine before heading back out into the field. Around the winery we saw Western Bluebirds, Western Tanager, American Robins, Northern Rough-winged Swallows, Brewer’s Blackbirds and more. Carrying on, we explored White Lake, where a few shorebirds were foraging along the muddy fringe of the lake. There were Least Sandpiper, Baird’s Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher, Wilson’s Snipe and Killdeer here, as well as two Red-necked Phalaropes out on the water. Ducks included all three local species of teal (Green-winged, Blue-winged and Cinnamon), as well as Gadwall and Mallard. Near White Lk, we scoped a pair of re-introduced Burrowing Owls near the burrow. At Three Gates Farm we had a quick visit, spotting our first Pine Siskin and Spotted Towhee of the tour.

Before returning to Osoyoos, we headed up Irrigation Creek Road, near Vaseux Lake. In a

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Our group. From left to right: Qingshan, Chris, Lei, Yiqi. Aug 2018. Photo: Dick Cannings.

patch of elderberries along a little stream, we counted close to 15 Lewis’s Woodpeckers. A Hairy Woodpecker was here as well, but it was not see by the others unfortunately. A Canyon Wren emerged from the cliff and called for several minutes while we watched through the scope. Our first Pygmy Nuthatch sat on a pine snag for scope views, our third and all three species of nuthatch in Canada seen in one day. As we drove down by the cliffs, a flock of 75 Black-billed Magpies crossed the road. Say’s Phoebe sat on a fence post here as well.

Back in Osoyoos we had dinner before heading out to search for nocturnal birds in the Richter Pass area. It was not our night, however, and we heard no owls and saw no poorwills. We did see some very small bats feeding over a calm pond however, which was interesting.

August 20 – Before leaving Osoyoos, we were sure to see some of the common urban birds, such as House Sparrow, Eurasian Collared-Dove, Rock Pigeon, Ring-billed Gull and California Gull, boosting up our trip list. Back at the north end of Osoyoos Lake, we caught up with a couple more species this morning, such as a Virginia Rail and a Sora, both seen quite well. Also found was a Northern Waterthrush, a Lazuli Bunting and a leader only Marsh Wren. The birding on Old Richter Pass Road was very good this morning as we encountered a couple of large mixed migrant flocks. We had done poorly on warblers up until this point, but here we added Orange-crowned, Wilson’s, Nashville and a leader only MacGillivray’s Warbler to the list. A nice bright Cassin’s Vireo came in to investigate us along with some shy Gray Catbirds, several Black-headed Grosbeaks and colorful Western Tanagers. A male Downy Woodpecker appeared on the scene, again another treat for my clients who were fond of woodpeckers. Mule Deer came out of the woods to check us out, and having seen White-tailed Deer earlier in the trip, made or a nice comparison. Farther down the road in an open area there were dozens of American Goldfinches. Mixed in were also Savannah Sparrow, Lazuli Bunting, House Finch and more. A Red-naped Sapsucker sat on a post long enough for good scope views. We also saw several Northern Flickers, including a male integrade ‘Red-shafted / Yellow-shafted’ bird. On the wires were dozens of Violet-green Swallows, providing us the first good views of this species for the trip. An immature Cooper’s Hawk ripped through the flock, but seemed to miss its intended catch. Along Kruger Mountain Road we were excited to find two of the continuing Lesser Goldfinches in the area. There was a male and a female bird here, next to a small vineyard. Also noted were Red Crossbill, Western Tanager, and our first Cedar Waxwings. After we narrowly missed being eaten by two giant growling Rottweilers, we headed over to a friend’s house to search for hummingbirds. We were not disappointed as we saw an immature male Anna’s Hummingbird, a Calliope Hummingbird and a Rufous Hummingbird here.

As the morning was now getting on, it was time for us to begin traveling. On the way to Princeton, I came to a fast stop when I saw two Pileated Woodpeckers on a roadside telephone pole. By the time I backed up, the birds were unfortunately gone. We had lunch in Princeton and returned to Vancouver, adding a Glaucous-winged Gull as the final species on our tour. I really enjoyed birding with Yiqi, Lei and Qingshan, and hope to make their acquaintance again someday! Our final species total was 115 for the group plus 17 species seen or heard by the leader only.

Our trip list:

Canada Goose

Blue-winged Teal

Cinnamon Teal

Gadwall

American Wigeon

Mallard

Northern Pintail

Green-winged Teal

Redhead

Barrow’s Goldeneye

Hooded Merganser (leader only)

Common Merganser

California Quail

Gray Partridge

Ring-necked Pheasant

Sooty Grouse

Pied-billed Grebe

Red-necked Grebe

Great Blue Heron

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Northern Harrier

Cooper’s Hawk

Swainson’s Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

American Kestrel

Merlin

Peregrine Falcon

Virginia Rail

Sora

American Coot

Killdeer

Least Sandpiper

Baird’s Sandpiper

Long-billed Dowitcher

Short-billed Dowitcher

Solitary Sandpiper

Lesser Yellowlegs

Greater Yellowlegs

Red-necked Phalarope

California Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Glaucous-winged Gull

Rock Pigeon

Eurasian Collared-Dove

Mourning Dove

Great Horned Owl

Burrowing Owl

Common Nighthawk (leader only)

Black Swift (leader only)

Anna’s Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Calliope Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Lewis’s Woodpecker

Red-naped Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker (leader only)

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker (leader only)

Western Wood-Pewee

Willow Flycatcher

Hammond’s Flycatcher (leader only)

Say’s Phoebe

Eastern Kingbird

Cassin’s Vireo

Warbling Vireo (leader only)

Canada Jay

Steller’s Jay

Clark’s Nutcracker

Black-billed Magpie

American Crow

Northwestern Crow

Common Raven

Tree Swallow (leader only)

Violet-green Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Bank Swallow (leader only)

Barn Swallow

Black-capped Chickadee

Mountain Chickadee

Chestnut-backed Chickadee (leader only)

Boreal Chickadee (leader only)

Red-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Pygmy Nuthatch

Brown Creeper (leader only)

Canyon Wren

House Wren

Pacific Wren

Marsh Wren (leader only)

American Dipper (leader only)

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (leader only)

Western Bluebird

Swainson’s Thrush (leader only)

American Robin

Gray Catbird

European Starling

Cedar Waxwing

Northern Waterthrush

Orange-crowned Warbler

Nashville Warbler

MacGillivray’s Warbler (leader only)

Common Yellowthroat

Yellow Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Townsend’s Warbler (leader only)

Wilson’s Warbler

Western Tanager

Black-headed Grosbeak

Lazuli Bunting

Spotted Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Brewer’s Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco (leader only)

Bobolink (leader only)

Red-winged Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Brewer’s Blackbird

House Sparrow

House Finch

Cassin’s Finch

Red Crossbill

Pine Siskin

Lesser Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

132 species, counting leader only. 115 species for group.

Chris Charlesworth, Avocet Tours

Day Tour, August 9, 2018, in the Central Okanagan Valley.

At 6:30 AM, I met Trevor, from the U.K. at the Air BnB he was staying at in Lake Country. We headed directly for Beaver Lake Road where we would spend the majority of our morning. Though we had planned to spend a full day out in the field, forecast temperatures for today were to reach 40 degrees Celsius, so we decided to do just a half day instead. Some of the first birds we found along lower Beaver Lake Road included comical California Quail, as well as Lazuli Buntings, Vesper Sparrows, Western

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Downy Woodpecker, Kelowna, BC. Chris Charlesworth.

Meadowlarks, Say’s Phoebe, and both Western and Eastern kingbirds. A distant hummingbird feeder produced our only Calliope Hummingbird for the morning, and we also had good looks at a Black-chinned Hummingbird this morning. In one particular patch of scrubby deciduous habitat we encountered a nice number of birds including Willow Flycatcher, Hammond’s Flycatcher, Swainson’s Thrush, Spotted Towhee, Gray Catbird, Downy Woodpecker, House Wren, Western Tanager, Bullock’s Oriole, Warbling Vireo and a nice Northern Waterthrush. The grassland areas also produced nice views of American Kestrel, as well as Turkey Vulture, Bald Eagle, and Red-tailed Hawk. A mixed flock of blackbirds we found included Brewer’s and Red-winged blackbirds as well as a quite a few juvenile Brown-headed Cowbirds. After a little bit of searching we found a pair of Western Bluebirds that were feeding a late brood in the boxes along the fence line. Nearby was a spotted juvenile Western Bluebird, perhaps from the same pair’s previous brood.

Once we entered the mixed forests of upper Beaver Lake Road, we began to encounter birds of a different type. At most stops were Mountain Chickadees, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Yellow-rumped Warblers and Pine Siskins. Warblers were present in nice

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Warbling Vireo. Kelowna, BC. Chris Charlesworth.

numbers and we saw Nashville, Orange-crowned and Townsend’s warblers, as well as Cassin’s Vireos, Cassin’s Finch and a fly-over Evening Grosbeak. Varied Thrush was heard, but remained hidden, while we had views of both Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned kinglets together in the same pine tree. Amongst all the Red-breasted Nuthatches, I was somewhat surprised to see two White-breasted Nuthatches this morning. Five Red-naped Sapsuckers were also nice to see, all together in one aspen snag. One was an adult and the rest of them appeared to be juveniles. Both Steller’s Jays and Gray Jays were found near Beaver Lake Lodge, and we also saw Common Loons and Osprey at the lake.

To finish off our half day, we headed for Kelowna’s Robert Lake. Birding, as usual was excellent here and we tallied 40 species at this location. Shorebirds included Red-necked Phalarope, Greater and Lesser yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper and Spotted Sandpiper.

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Red-tailed Hawk. Kelowna, BC. Chris Charlesworth.

Waterfowl were abundant with highlights including Cinnamon and Blue-winged teal, Northern Shoveler, hundreds of Ruddy Ducks, Ring-necked Duck, Bufflehead, Redhead and more. There were Pied-billed and Eared grebes, and a good number of Ring-billed and California gulls here today. We had nice views of Sora in the Marsh, and though I had a couple of views of Virginia Rail, Trevor had to settle just for hearing them. Yellow-headed Blackbirds were common, along with Red-winged Blackbirds, Brewer’s Blackbirds and loads of European Starlings. As we drove back towards Lake Country, Trevor spotted a Swainson’s Hawk soaring to the east of Glenmore Road. At the end of the ‘morning’ we had seen over a hundred species, including 37 new ones for Trevor!

Chris Charlesworth

Day Tour – August 3, 2018, in the Central Okanagan Valley, BC.

At 6:30 AM I met up with three clients, Mark, Don and Jen, near the west end of the Bennett Bridge in Kelowna. Mark is from Peru and is an active birder, while Dave and Jen are more casual birders from Kelowna.

Our first stop was at Munson Pond, where from a viewing platform, we had nice views of

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Eastern Kingbird. Kelowna, BC. Chris Charlesworth.

a number of Wood Ducks. We had our only Great Blue Heron of the day, perched in a tree on the far side of the pond. A little ‘island’ in the middle of the pond had Spotted Sandpiper, Killdeer and our only Least Sandpiper for the day. Eastern Kingbirds sallied out to catch bugs from cottonwoods along the lake’s edge and a couple of Red-tailed Hawks sat on nearby snags.

The next stop was at Sutherland Hills Park. Here, we wandered through the Ponderosa Pine forest, exploring a small pond, ringed with berry bushes. Highlights here were a Hairy Woodpecker, some Black-capped Chickadees, Cedar Waxwings, more Eastern Kingbirds and American Robins. Perhaps the birds were hiding, we thought, due to a steady rain that fell on us at this location. To cheer us up, I spotted a roosting Western Screech-Owl that stared at us from his hiding spot.

At Robert Lake, in Kelowna, there was plenty to look at, including an impressive array of waterfowl. There were hundreds of Ruddy Ducks about, and lesser numbers of Ring-necked Ducks, Bufflehead, Redheads, Mallards, Gadwall, Cinnamon Teal and also Pied-billed and Eared grebes. Raptors included Bald Eagle and Red-tailed Hawk, and we had views of Virginia Rail and Sora. Shorebirds were mostly hidden behind the reeds, but we did add Wilson’s Snipe, and Lesser and Greater yellowlegs. Every swallow species found in the Okanagan was seen here, and in the reeds we had both Red-winged and Yellow-headed blackbirds. With 34 species seen here in a short time, Robert Lake is always a highlight.

We made our way north along Glenmore Road, adding a Swainson’s Hawk to the list, along the way. The journey up Beaver Lake Road produced upwards of 60 species today.

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Yellow-rumped Warbler. Kelowna, BC. Chris Charlesworth.

We were lucky that the temperatures were not smoking hot and the bird activity was quite good throughout the afternoon. In the grassland areas of lower Beaver Lake Road, Turkey Vulture, Bald Eagle, Swainson’s Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk made appearances, along with several American Kestrels and a Merlin. Western Meadowlarks, Western and Eastern kingbirds, Say’s Phoebe, Vesper Sparrows, and a Western Bluebird were all nice to see along the fences at the edge of the road. Lazuli Buntings were quite numerous, and we saw some House Wrens as well. In a patch of berry bushes we had nice views of Nashville Warblers, a Black-headed Grosbeak, a with Gray Catbird, Spotted Towhee as well as Bullock’s Oriole and Western Tanager.

We entered the forested areas of Beaver Lake Road at around km 8, and began to encounter different species at each stop such as Mountain Chickadee, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Pine Siskin, Cassin’s Finch, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Western Wood-Pewee. A group of 6-7 young Ruffed Grouse flushed from the edge of one trail, and at the same time a Barred Owl hooted in the distance. Red-naped Sapsucker, Pileated Woodpecker and Northern Flicker, all woodpecker species, were great to see this afternoon.

We had lunch at Beaver Lake, where Common Loons, Osprey and both Barn and Tree swallows were tallied, and then we took a stroll through the woods to the south of Beaver Lake Lodge. We didn’t see too much, other than some Dark-eyed Juncos, Yellow-rumped Warblers and Northern Flicker, but we did have excellent views of a female Spruce Grouse! The bird lived up to its name as ‘foolhen’ as we strolled right past it about 8 feet away. She eventually flew up into a spruce and watched us pass by.

Along Dee Lake Road, at our first stop, we were treated to stunning views of a Northern Pygmy-Owl! The owl was being mobbed by quite the number of birds like American Robins, Dark-eyed Juncos, Mountain Chickadees and Yellow-rumped Warblers. We had nice looks at a Townsend’s Warbler here today.

At Dee Lake itself, a stroll along a path following the lakeshore, was quite enjoyable. There were Steller’s Jays about, and hummingbird feeders attracted both Rufous and

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Northern Waterthrush. Kelowna, BC. Chris Charlesworth.

Calliope hummingbirds. Up to four Northern Waterthrushes came in to investigate some ‘pishing’, and they were joined by Orange-crowned Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler and Song Sparrows. A Lincoln’s Sparrow, our only for the day, paused to check us out at one point. It was now getting late in the afternoon and we had encountered just over a hundred species (104 to be exact), so we headed back through Kelowna and across the Bennett Bridge where I dropped Mark, Dave and Jen off after a very enjoyable late summer’s day of birding.

Chris Charlesworth

South Okanagan Day Tour – July 28, 2018

On Saturday, July 28, I had the opportunity to guide Neil Davidson from Scotland around the South Okanagan. Neil has visited many places around the world, but this trip was his first real taste of North American birding. We met at the south campground at Okanagan Lake Provincial Park near Summerland at 6 AM. We headed south, making our first stop along White Lake Road where we saw a couple of Burrowing Owls, birds from the reintroduction program underway in southern BC’s interior. Sparrows and other small passerines were everywhere in the sagebrush with good numbers of Vesper Sparrows, Chipping Sparrows, a Lark Sparrow, Western Kingbird, Eastern Kingbird, a male Lazuli Bunting and a male Bullock’s Oriole. Our first of several Red-tailed Hawks was noted here, and close to White Lk itself we saw two Sage Thrashers. The lake, which is full of water this summer, had quite a nice assortment of waterfowl with Ruddy Ducks, Cinnamon Teal, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Ring-necked Duck, Mallard and female type Hooded Merganser present. Shorebirds included Greater and Lesser yellowlegs, Wilson’s Phalarope, Least Sandpiper and Killdeer. Our only Western Meadowlarks of the day were spotted at White Lake as well.

We made a short stop in the pine forest near Mahoney Lake. Here we saw Pygmy Nuthatch, heard White-breasted Nuthatch, and saw other pine forest birds too like Cassin’s Finch, Western Wood-Pewee, Spotted Towhee and the like. As we drove along today we saw dozens and dozens of California Quail about, including many little ones toting along behind the adults. A roadside stop produced two Black-headed Grosbeaks, including a gorgeous male. We had a quick look for American Dippers at Okanagan Falls, but none were to be seen.

 Next up, we headed up into the mountains east of Okanagan Falls, via Shuttleworth Creek Road. Our first stop was at a prominent viewpoint where we had excellent views of two Lewis’s Woodpeckers, an adult and a juvenile. The adult was still feeding young in a nest cavity in an old dead Ponderosa Pine. Also here were some nice Western Bluebirds, a juvenile Red-naped Sapsucker, and soaring Turkey Vultures in the distance. In the tall spruce woods along Dutton Creek we encountered one of our highlights for the day, a Northern Pygmy-Owl. The owl called incessantly as we watched, and a number of birds came in to mob it including Red-breasted Nuthatch, Mountain Chickadee, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Warbling Vireo and more. Up to 10 Common Nighthawks passed overhead, and we caught a glimpse of Hammond’s Flycatcher as well.

From Dutton Creek we headed up to the Venner Larches. It was pretty quiet here, with no sign of Williamson’s Sapsuckers unfortunately. Of note were several Gray Jays and a Brown Creeper. A stop at Venner Meadows was also productive. We had a nice Townsend’s Solitaire here, as well as views of a scruffy Ruby-crowned Kinglet, a White-crowned Sparrow, Willow Flycatcher, Olive-sided Flycatcher and a Solitary Sandpiper foraging in a pond. We descended back into the valley bottom and checked out the towering cliffs at Vaseux Lake. The temperatures were well over 30 degrees Celsius at this point, which didn’t particularly help with respect to finding birds, however we managed to get a nice view of a Rock Wren and we heard several Canyon Wrens up higher on the rocks.

After a quick pit-stop in Osoyoos to pick up some refreshments we headed up into the lower Richter Pass in search of a Canadian rarity, Lesser Goldfinch. We staked out our location on Kruger Mountain Road and we waited, watched and listened. No Lesser Goldfinch was to be found here, but we did get some other nice birds including Black-chinned, Calliope and Rufous hummingbirds at a feeder. Also about were both Western and Mountain bluebirds, as well as American Goldfinch, Cedar Waxwing and House Wren. As we began driving away I had my window down and I heard the plaintive calls of a Lesser Goldfinch so we hopped out and quickly got a male in the scope as he sat on the telephone wires above. Score! Then, while driving along Old Richter Pass Road, close to Hwy 3, I heard another Lesser Goldfinch calling. Perhaps there is a little population of this species ‘invading’ the hills around the border town of Osoyoos.

We drove through the bustling resort town of Osoyoos, and then climbed up into the mountains on the east side of town. Along the way we saw an adult Swainson’s Hawk soaring over a bit of grassland. The views would have been spectacular if it wasn’t for the rather thick smoke from local wildfires. Our target bird was Great Gray Owl and after a little searching in a patch of larch, spruce and fir, we were rewarded with the sighting of a majestic adult Great Gray roosting quite low to the ground. This made Neil’s day, as it was his 37th owl species and it was also a very nice birthday bird for him.

We traveled back down to Osoyoos and had a short stop at Road 22. There is a nice muddy patch on the south side of Road 22 where there were Long-billed Dowitchers, Greater and Lesser yellowlegs, Wilson’s Phalarope, several unidentified peeps, a Wilson’s Snipe and best of all an alternate plumage Black-bellied Plover. A Wood Duck was a nice catch in one of the oxbows close to Road 22. Neil spotted a male Ring-necked Pheasant in a field, a species I don’t see too often these days. We returned to Okanagan Lake Park and had one last look for one more bird, a Western Screech-Owl. We didn’t find it, however we saw Gray Catbird, Yellow Warbler and a lovely Common Loon, a nice ending to a fantastic day trip in the South Okanagan. Today we saw 103 species and counting heard birds we had 120 species. Mammals noted today included White-tailed Deer, Mule Deer, Mountain Goat, Yellow-bellied Marmot, Yellow Pine Chipmunk, American Red Squirrel and Columbian Ground-Squirrel. It was really a very enjoyable day to be out in the field, despite the sizzling heat.

Chris Charlesworth, Avocet Tours